Justice, Compassion and Forgiveness in 2012 China

Since the occasion, content and persona non grata status of the authors/interviewee make these two articles too sensitive in China, I’m not typing them here. You’ll have to click through to get the details. But even in the American mainstream media, I rarely see this kind of thing.

‘I Forgive Them’

I know that those responsible for oppression in China will also find themselves vulnerable one day, just like Absalom did. And so the question stands: When that day comes, will China continue with a pattern of harsh retribution, or a will it begin a path of grace, mercy and compassion? … I still mourn for what “could have been.” And for a long time, I battled bitterness and anger whenever I thought of the leaders who chose to take a path of destruction that day.

But then I was confronted with the example of Jesus. He loved women, children, the poor and the oppressed in a way that was radically countercultural — and he called me to do the same.

He also forgave the very people who ridiculed him and nailed him to a cross: “Father, forgive them, for they know not what they do.” (Luke 24:34)

And again, he called me to do the same.

Because of Jesus, I forgive them.

The Pastor of China’s Underground Railroad

Christians “fill the gap” in civil society. “They were the first group driving the tractors and buses after the earthquake in Sichuan [in 2008]. They were the majority of the volunteers.” […]

“They’re deserted on the street and there’s no government system to take care of them. It was the Christians who brought them into their homes, fed them and gave them education. Then the government arrested them, and forced this leader to put [the children] on the street. He said we would rather [see] them on the street than being taken care of by the Christians.”

We have more on Tiananmen and Christianity in China, but on those topics and others related to this post I also highly recommend the always-impressive Seeing Red in China blog. Here some related stuff from us: